WardheerNews http://www.wardheernews.com WardheerNews News From Far Far Away Sat, 04 Jul 2015 02:58:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Reading the Résumés of Cadaado’s Four Frontrunners http://www.wardheernews.com/reading-the-resumes-of-cadaados-four-frontrunners/ http://www.wardheernews.com/reading-the-resumes-of-cadaados-four-frontrunners/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 22:42:45 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32156 By Faisal A. Roble The ongoing Cadaado conference, a herculean effort to establish an administration for Somalia’s central regions, has many ills and challenges. One challenge is whether Cadaado, with its 1.5 regions, fulfills constitutional requirements to become a state, … Continued

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By Faisal A. Roble

The ongoing Cadaado conference, a herculean effort to establish an administration for Somalia’s central regions, has many ills and challenges. One challenge is whether Cadaado, with its 1.5 regions, fulfills constitutional requirements to become a state, or it is only an Interim Administration. Another challenge is Cadaado’s entanglement with Puntland state on matters regarding boundary issues.

In a recent radio interview, the country’s Prime Minister, Sharmarke II, said Cadaado conference does not concern Puntland’s regions including the city of Galkayo. Some view this position as a noncommittal and vaguely as maverick as the PM himself. Nonetheless, it completely contradicts or eclipses previous remarks made by his boss, President Hassan Sheikh Mahmoud, that Cadaado concerns both Galgaduud and Mudug. Whether the PM and his boss are intentionally misleading us or have different positions on this volatile issue remains to be seen.

qaybdiid

Abdi Hassan Qaybdid

Still a third potentially devastating challenge is another rival conference for similar objective that is taking place in Dhusamreeb sponsored by Ahlu-Sunna wal Jama, a semi-Sufi religious group with para-military armed militia. There is a lot of uncertainty as to how much of a stumbling block Ahlu-Suna Waljama can be.

State formation in post-civil war Somalia is wrought with incessant local squabbles on representations and clan interest balancing. Manipulation of the process by Villa Somalia tops all problems. In the past, it blackmailed Jubbaland, totally controlled the outcome of Southwest, and is now poised to controlling the outcome of Cadaado. Given the mounting challenges facing this region, only a competent, consensus building and someone who knows what public policy is can help it with stand its challenges. My small contribution here is to highlight the resumes of the frontrunners.

Abdi Hassan Qaybdid

To start with, I would never wish any Somali to be a subject or citizen in a government, local or otherwise, presided by one of Somalia’s notorious warlords – yes you guessed it right, Abdi Hassan Qaybdid. This candidate, whose name when translated into English, reads as “he who does not accept equal share,” should never be in Somali politics. Pushing to his mid or late seventies, he represents a relic that reminds us Somalia’s civil-war and as such should have either disappeared from the political scene into a retirement oblivion, or be answering questions of “ethnic cleansing” to an international tribune. In the last few years, a period where many Somalis have been trying to ameliorate the impacts of past pains, this candidate has been beating war drums aloud.

Abdikarim Guuleed

abdikarim Gulet

Abdikarim Guuled

So entrenched in Somalia’s post-civil war political Islam, candidate Abdikarim Guuleed’s resume does read more as a leader to be avoided at any cost. He suddenly rose from the ranks of an unemployed small time deacon to Somalia’s interior minister at a time when the nation needed a competent steward. It was due to his lack of prior experience at high offices that Abdikarim showed extreme incompetency in managing the 2014 Ankara talks between Mogadishu and Hargeisa.

A not so insignificant issue is that he is affiliated with dumel Jadid, a hard core religious cult that is only one shade away from Al-shabab. His education level is dubious and unimpressive.

During his brief tenure at Villa Somalia, this candidate created bad omen between the people of Jubbaland and Mogadishu; he fanned conflict and fomented inter-group war. According to the 2013 Monitoring group’s repost, he is accused of diverting public resources to Al-Shabab commanders in the area of both Marka and Jubbaland.

Both his version of political Islam and lack of experience in governance may not serve well the Central region given its massive unattended needs (famine, lack of infrastructure, coexistence and cooperation with its neighboring regions).

Ali Faqi Moallim

Until 2012, this third candidate was Somalia’s security chief and was fired by the current President. Ali Faqi Moallim is a longtime friend and political protégé of President Sharief Ahmed. During Sharief’s reign, he served as an intelligence boss, as ambassador to Sudan, and as Somali National Intelligence and Security Agency (SNISA) Chief.

Fiqi

Ali Faqi Moallim

There are unsubstantiated allegations against Ali Faqi of torturing innocent civilians while he was on the hunt for Al-Shabab militia. Yet, because Somalis have negative memories about past national intelligence forces, such accusations will prove to remain resilient and hard to dispel.

To his defense though, he claims that he had taken draconian but necessary measures to neutralize Al-Shabab during his tenure, but was always sabotage by traditional elders in Mogadishu. His other sore point on his image includes accusations of financial corruptions, almost all of which he denies.

Ahmed Abdisalam

A diplomat, Western educated Somali Canadian, and a former deputy Prime Minister (2007), Ahmed Abdi Salam Aden appears to be by far the most qualified and most experienced political agent for change in the region. His resume reads like a modern secular politician that should not only run the affairs of Central Somalia, but given the right circumstances, that of the entire country.

Amb Ahmed Abdisalam

Ahmed Abdisalam

While organizing this region at the grassroots level and consulting with elders to improve local security and establish local governance, “in 2012 he was wounded in a suicide attack by Al-Shabaab in Dhusamareeb. It is a personal matter to him to be a crusader for the war on terror against Al-Shabab as well as to establish a system of government for his region. He has been involved in this project longer than any of the candidates.

As a matter of fact, he is the only one in the pack who can claim to be free either from Somalia’s post-civil war infliction – religious extremism, or from the political culture of warlords.

Ambassador Ahmed is a man who is well positioned to creating coalitions among Somalis, a badly needed skill in contemporary Somalia that is so compartmentalized. Being a cosmopolitan person by nature, he has shown that he has the potential to work with his neighboring Puntland region. He believes that the two sister regions can coexist and cooperate on mutual interest areas, can work out their differences in the most amicable way and replace confrontation with cooperation. Ambassador Ahmed’s personal and political relationships both at the local and regional levels represent an asset that none of the rest of the frontrunners has.

The rest of the job – picking the right candidate rightly belongs to the residents of the area.

Faisal Roble
WardheerNews contributor
Email: faisalroble19@gmail.com
——

Faisal Roble is a writer, political analyst and a former Editor-in-Chief of WardheerNews, mainly interested in the Horn of Africa region. He is currently the Principle Planner for the City of Los Angeles in charge of Master Planning, Economic Development and Project Implementation Division.

 

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Democratization Process in Puntland: Challenges and Opportunities http://www.wardheernews.com/democratization-process-in-puntland-challenges-and-opportunities/ http://www.wardheernews.com/democratization-process-in-puntland-challenges-and-opportunities/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 19:20:03 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32150 By Mohamed Jibrell Background Puntland was established in 1998. It has since then stood out as one of the few stable regions in Somalia. The 1998 Garowe Community Constitutional Conference that led to the formation of Puntland State of Somalia … Continued

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By Mohamed Jibrell

Background

Puntland was established in 1998. It has since then stood out as one of the few stable regions in Somalia. The 1998 Garowe Community Constitutional Conference that led to the formation of Puntland State of Somalia was a successful experiment in establishing a regional state. This pioneering act illustrates how governance and development have become localized in Somalia and that the capacity of the people from the former Northeast regions of Somalia have come to manage and finance large and complex political processes with limited international support. As in the English proverb, the proof of pudding is in its eating, Puntland by playing a constructive role among its Somali neighbors, hosting more than 100,000 refugees from South Somalia, and at the same time leading efforts to resolve Somalia’s regional conflicts peacefully has shown its mettle as a reliable friend to all Somalis and the other peoples of the Horn Africa Region. That Puntland has been a cornerstone of the Federal government in hosting Garowe 1, 2, Galkacio conferences to implement the road-map agenda of ending Somalia’s transitional junctures is another illustration of its good intentions in the region.

Garowe Puntland

Garowe, Puntland

Puntland is part of Somalia Federal government and yet it has its unique features of governance as well as strategic geographic position in East Africa. It is increasing its importance to the international community by collaborating with the US, the European Union and other stakeholders on terrorism, piracy and on a range of other critical issues without in anyway encumbering the Federal Somali Government’s efforts to forge a sustainable path for Somalia.

Puntland’s governance role

Thus far since its establishment, Puntland has thrived on a path of consultative clan power sharing, but it is now changing tack and getting on a path of democratic governance and public sector reform. Puntland’s socio-economic status is currently better off than most of the other regions of Somalia – particularly those in central and southern regions- in terms of stability and security, and public institutions building. In its 15 years of existence, Puntland state of Somalia has created an enabling and encouraging environment for private and public sector institutions by taking on and succeeding in the building of the capacity of major social issues, including but not limited to, the level of education, improvement to the health sector, usage of electricity and wider access to water.

Despite the positive developments of the recent past, the political system remains dominated by traditional, clan-based systems of governance in the absence of political parties, across clan organization or community power structures. In addition, the parliament is selected on the basis of clan distribution quotas, with traditional elders proposing the names of MP’s, ministers and administrative officials. The revival of Xeer (customary law) as an alternative to state laws following the collapse of the Central Somali government in 1991 was critical in maintaining semblance of law and order.

Situational analysis

Since 1998, the government of Puntland has been gradually gaining the confidence of the people through the re-establishment of public sector institutions in order to primarily provide public security and basic services. However, the capacities of these public institutions started at different stages and the demand for services from the beneficiaries have been steadily growing in higher proportion than the delivery capacity of the government institutions. Today, the time has come for Puntland to take the lead in framing the essential policies that would shape the overall socio-economic development of the State, which would translate into major efforts organized by the government in partnership with the international community and the engagement of all stakeholders on the overall reconstruction of Puntland.

The distinction between description (how polices are made) and prescription (how policies should be made) can’t be excluded from consideration of Puntland’s efforts in developing relevant and appropriate policies. However, policy issues applied to any given issue may be truncated. A more analytical approach would encourage two questions: what we are trying to do and how will we know when we have done it? Since there is usually a gap between the expected and the desired futures it is necessary to identify the constraints and limiting factors. Democratic governance addresses the allocation and management of resources to respond to collective problems and is characterized by the principles of participation, transparency, accountability, rule of law, effectiveness, equity and strategic vision.

Puntland’s 2nd five year Development Plan proposes the development of strong, democratic, public-sector institutions as a critical component of its mission. It is through improved governance that the benefits of democratic development most directly impact the lives of citizens. Conversely, the inability of public sector institutions to function effectively and democratically undermines the sustainability of democratic reform. Democratic institutions provide the setting for equitable distribution of benefits from growth. In short, more peaceful and more prosperous nations contribute to a more stable environment. There are compelling reasons to care about whether the quality of governance is good across the state. For the good of our citizens and for the sake of our common aims, the capacity of weak states like Puntland to govern should be strengthened because countries that are well governed are both less likely to be less violent and are less likely to be poor.

Read more: Puntland democratization process

Mohamed Jibrell
Member of the advisory board
Puntland Development Research Center (PDRC), Garowe, Somalia
Former Lecturer and Dean
Trinity College, Hartford CT
Email:Jibrellm@gmail.com

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Eritrean Refugees’ Trek Through the Americas http://www.wardheernews.com/eritrean-refugees-trek-through-the-americas/ http://www.wardheernews.com/eritrean-refugees-trek-through-the-americas/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 16:32:50 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32142 By Dan Connell, Middle East Research and Information Project. TAPACHULA, MEXICO—It is not hard to find the Eritreans in this low-key town near the Pacific coast a few miles north of the Guatemalan border. They gather on the front steps … Continued

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By Dan Connell, Middle East Research and Information Project.

TAPACHULA, MEXICO—It is not hard to find the Eritreans in this low-key town near the Pacific coast a few miles north of the Guatemalan border. They gather on the front steps of the Palafox Hotel with the only other Africans here—Somalis, Ethiopians, a handful of Ghanaians, all of them migrants—or they crowd into the bustling Internet café across the street.

On a recent afternoon, I met two who had been released from a maximum-security detention center here the night before. They were surprisingly at ease, giddy at the thought that they had passed over the last major hurdle to reaching the United States. All they had to do now was fly to northern Mexico and walk across a bridge. But it had been a long, arduous journey, and I could see they were still jumpy.

African Migrants Centeral AmericaTesfay, a Catholic from the market town of Keren, a crossroads for Eritrea’s diverse cultures and religious faiths, left his country in 2007 at the age of 20 after being caught in a giffa (roundup) and taken to the Sawa military training center for induction into Eritrea’s “national service” together with thousands of other young men and women. Most of his cohort feared they were in for an indefinite term at pay so low their parents would have to subsidize them for the foreseeable future.

But there was nothing they could do, as dissent had been crushed a decade earlier when thousands were jailed, the independent press shut down and protest of any kind strictly prohibited. The only legal political party was the ruling liberation front, renamed the People’s Front for Democracy and Justice, and no non-governmental organization was permitted that was not under state or PFDJ control. Even religious practice was restricted to four denominations, all of which were to a degree controlled by the state.

At the end of his training, Tesfay walked out of the camp and kept going until he reached Kassala, Sudan. He was one of thousands who have done so over the last decade, making Eritrea, with a population of less than 5 million, one of the largest producers of asylum seekers in the world, after such hot-war zones as Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq.

Over the past year, I have interviewed hundreds of refugees in camps and communities in North America, Europe, Israel and Africa to ask why they left. Most cite indefinite national service, but many also mention intolerable abuse, humiliation and punishment for things like raising a question about their status, suspicions they planned to leave or abetted someone else’s flight, or just praying while in the service. Such offenses, real or imagined, are almost never prosecuted at a military hearing; the accused simply vanishes into one of Eritrea’s many secret prisons to languish for years with no one tracking them and no hope of release but by escape.

Hundreds do escape every year, which may seem incongruous for such a tightly controlled state. But those I have spoken with who did so describe a growing breakdown in discipline and security in situations where those guarding them are themselves untrained and poorly motivated conscripts. In some cases, the guards leave with them.

Search for a Safe Haven

After a year in Sudan, Tesfay became ever more frustrated at his lack of prospects and fearful of Eritrean security forces who frequently crossed the border in search of escapees. He got on the phone to relatives and raised $3,500 to pay smugglers to take him to the Egyptian Sinai so he could cross into Israel. In September 2008, he reached Tel Aviv, where he joined a growing number of Eritreans who were coming since a clampdown on migration through Libya, the route most Eritrean refugees had taken in years past to get to Europe, where they thought they would be safe.

But after six years of relative quiet, he was swept up in another giffa, this time directed by Israeli authorities, who were corralling Eritreans and sending them to the newly constructed Holot detention center in the Negev desert. By then there were 35,000 in the country, along with 15,000 Sudanese, and anti-African sentiment was reaching a fever pitch, as demagogic politicians stoked the anger among ultra-nationalists who wanted the Africans out. One member of Knesset from the right-wing Likud Party, Miri Regev, had termed the refugees “a cancer in our body.”

At the end of 2012, the government began to implement measures to reverse the influx. The first step was the completion of a high-security border fence running from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea. The second, a year later, was the Holot detentions. Deportation or “voluntary” departure was to be the final one.

Holot is a desolate place with no facilities for its inmates apart from a cafeteria and beds, though its gates are open during the days and evenings, so residents can go in and out, as long as they get back for roll calls. In this respect, Holot functions as a kind of halfway house, designed to quarter refugees for limited periods while pressuring them to leave—but only under Israeli auspices.
When Tesfay joined a protest in June 2014 and marched to the Egyptian border with hundreds of other detainees to demand they be allowed to leave then and there, he was jailed at the maximum-security Saharonim prison across the road from Holot for three months. When he was released, he decided to go on Israel’s terms.

The choices he and others were offered were: Self-deport directly to Eritrea or accept a deal Israel worked out with Rwanda and Uganda to go to one of those countries. In either case, the refugees got $3,500 in cash and temporary travel documents that would be taken from them upon their arrival.

Tesfay took Rwanda, and the money. As soon as he got to Kigali, however, he arranged to go to Uganda to meet his wife, who had come from Sudan to escape what she had said was harassment and abuse because she was an Eritrean Christian. No place seemed safe, so they agreed that he would try to get to the United States and send for her.

The Circuitous Route to America

Once he had arranged air tickets and forged travel documents with smugglers in Kampala, he flew to Turkey, then to Brazil and finally to Ecuador, taking this roundabout route because the flights on Turkish Airlines were cheap. From Quito, he went by bus and foot across Colombia and up through Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala to the Mexican border, following a well-trodden path used by hundreds of Eritrean refugees each year, according to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) office in Tapachula.

His friend Ghebre was from Adi Quala in south-central Eritrea, close to the Ethiopian border. He had been sent to Sawa for military training in 2010, but on his first home leave 12 months later, he refused to go back. Three months later, he was arrested and sent to the notorious Aderser prison near Sawa, where he spent the next two years in what he described as unrelentingly harsh conditions. He escaped in 2013 by going to the hospital and slipping out with a guard he had befriended.

Ghebre and the guard went straight to Khartoum, Sudan, where the guard, also a national service conscript, arranged to be smuggled to Libya. Ghebre, who had fallen ill, stayed behind. He choked up as he told me he learned a few months later that his new friend had died in the Mediterranean trying to get to Italy, the route of choice once again by 2013, despite the dangers, now that Israel’s border was closed and Muammar al-Qaddafi’s regime was gone.

Others he knew had been detained in Sudan and sent back to Eritrea, leaving him scared to stay and scared to go to Libya. He said he had heard about the option of flying to South America to get to the United States and decided to try it. It took him several months to raise the money, but once he had it he flew to Brazil and followed the same route through Ecuador and Colombia as Tesfay had. They met in Panama and traveled the rest of the way together. By the time I encountered them, they were describing each other as “family.”

“Every Day Scared”

Ghebre and Tesfay moved along this modern-day underground railroad with dozens of refugees and migrants from Somalia, Pakistan and India, as well as Eritrea, traveling in small groups that met up at major transit stops. All the movement was coordinated by a network of smugglers—“agents,” they called them—who got the migrants through checkpoints and led them along little-used footpaths to bypass border posts.

In Colombia the travelers boarded boats for an eight-hour, middle-of-the-night ride on a small fishing boat to reach Panama, where they had plunged into the dense, largely uncharted wilds of the Darien Gap. Some of the time they walked; some they rode in long wooden canoes paddled by indigenous Panamanians whom the smugglers hired.

For two days, they were awakened before dawn to slog through undergrowth so tangled with vines and brambles they often could not see where they were putting their feet. The thick canopy overhead blocked the sun, but punishing temperatures and suffocating humidity left them drenched in sweat. Brief but intense bursts of rain offered some letup but left them dripping even more. No one wore long pants or long-sleeved shirts, the two men said, because it was too hard to move in wet clothing. Hence they were vulnerable to a hundred cuts and bruises from the spiky vegetation and razor-sharp grasses.

Some threw away clothes, food and even water when these items became too much to carry, forcing the migrants to drink from rivers the color of cappuccino. But if they did so, they paid the price with crippling bouts of diarrhea. At least one in Ghebre’s group gave up, he said.

Throughout the trek, the migrants kept as quiet as they could to avoid attracting the attention of Colombian drug runners who use the trails or the heavily armed border police who hunt them. When they emerged from the jungle, though, they stumbled on a military camp and were immediately detained. They were also fed. It was a relief, Ghebre said.

After four days he was loaded onto an army truck and taken to another camp, the second of four en route to Panama City. Each time he moved, he was asked for a bribe. At the fourth camp, he met Tesfay.

In Panama City the migrants were questioned and photographed, and then issued ten-day passes to get to Costa Rica. It took six days to get the money from relatives to pay for the trip. On day seven, a local “agent” put them on a bus.

For the next two weeks, they worried about being detained in one of the other countries they had to pass through or, worse, taken off a bus by one of the many drug-smuggling gangs that operate there. “I’m every day scared,” said Ghebre. “I’m not ever relaxed.”
None of this ordeal was made easier by their lack of Spanish. “We had very little contact with the people,” he said.

As it happened, the journey was uneventful—harrowing midnight hikes along barely marked mountain tracks, a pickup truck jammed with migrants careening along back roads in Nicaragua, hour after hour on rickety hand-me-down school buses in Honduras and Guatemala, but no hostile confrontations.

Jail Was a Relief

Detention finally came in Tapachula, just as they had expected. Nearly all of the migrants are aware of what awaits them at the Mexican border. Many Central Americans, fearing they will be turned back at Tapachula, slip into Mexico to the north near Tenosique so as to catch a freight train known as “the Beast” to the US border. Most African and Asian migrants, coached by the smugglers, go to the authorities instead.

Mexico gives them two choices: Petition for asylum, which is not difficult to get if you have a good case for it and can wait two to three months, or plead your case, ask for a travel permit and promise not to remain in Mexico. Take the second option and you are granted safe passage, with 30 days to get out of the country.

Mexico detains more refugees and migrants than nearly any country in the world—90,000 (not all at once) in 2012. In the first 11 months of 2014, the number jumped to 117,00, most from violence-plagued Honduras, El Salvador or Guatemala. By way of contrast, Britain detained 25,000 over a similar period.

The Estación Migratoria Siglo XXI in Tapachula is the largest detention site in Mexico, with a capacity of 960, but many people are held a week or less, giving the place a revolving-door feel. Most Eritreans view this delay as a minor irritant, after all they have been through.

The UNHCR also has an office here, but staff there can only guess at the number of Eritreans who come through based on detention statistics from the federal government, as almost none register as refugees. “They don’t approach the UN,” said Ana Silva Alfonso. “They know the way, and they are very well organized.”

I met Tesfay and Ghebre after they had been inside for seven days. Neither was fazed. All they were talking about was where to go next, California or Texas. They appeared to have no plan and no relatives to call upon in either state, but they had been reading posts on Facebook. They inclined toward the Hidalgo Bridge at McAllen, Texas, as their crossing into the United States.

Asked why the US, Tesfay merely shrugged and said, “I like freedom.”

Source: Middle East Research and Information Project

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Warka Raadiyo Wardheer http://www.wardheernews.com/warka-raadiyo-wardheer-584/ http://www.wardheernews.com/warka-raadiyo-wardheer-584/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 15:36:15 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32146 Warka Raadiyo Wardheer ee aan idiin heyno waxaa ka mid ah: Dowlada Soomaaliya oo sheegtay in ay dileen ku dhawaad 130 ka tirsan Maleeshiyaadka Al Shabaab weerar ay ka fuleyeen Shabeelaha Hoese iyo warar kalle. Fadlan hoos ka dhegeyso warka … Continued

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Warka Raadiyo Wardheer ee aan idiin heyno waxaa ka mid ah: Dowlada Soomaaliya oo sheegtay in ay dileen ku dhawaad 130 ka tirsan Maleeshiyaadka Al Shabaab weerar ay ka fuleyeen Shabeelaha Hoese iyo warar kalle.

Fadlan hoos ka dhegeyso warka oo dhan:

 

 

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Ethiopia: Single-minded progress http://www.wardheernews.com/ethiopia-single-minded-progress/ http://www.wardheernews.com/ethiopia-single-minded-progress/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 02:30:20 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32139 BY SAMUEL GEBRE Grand Renaissance Dam: Africa’s second-largest dam will produce 6,000 MW. Picture: GALLO IMAGES/AFP/ZACHARIAS ABUBEKER ETHIOPIA’S ruling party secured all 547 parliamentary seats in last month’s general elections, leaving no place in parliament for the opposition. The Ethiopian … Continued

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BY SAMUEL GEBRE

Grand Renaissance Dam. Picture: GALLO IMAGES/AFP/ZACHARIAS ABUBEKER
Grand Renaissance Dam: Africa’s second-largest dam will produce 6,000 MW. Picture: GALLO IMAGES/AFP/ZACHARIAS ABUBEKER

ETHIOPIA’S ruling party secured all 547 parliamentary seats in last month’s general elections, leaving no place in parliament for the opposition.

The Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front has been in power since 1991. Its democratic credentials are frequently under fire, even though it has been credited for economic growth that has averaged over 10% of GDP for the past decade.

The government is expected to use the election results to support its intention to continue with the second phase of its Growth & Transformation Plan (GTP), aimed at propelling the Horn of Africa nation to become a middle-income country by 2025.

Ethiopia introduced the GTP in 2010. It was the brainchild of former prime minister Meles Zenawi, and placed emphasis on agriculture, industry, infrastructure, social and human development and governance.

The first phase of the plan, which comes to an end this month, has been “impressive”, says Aly-Khan Satchu, a Nairobi-based financial analyst and investor. “Singularity of purpose and execution make Ethiopia’s fast growth possible.”

Ethiopia’s GDP has grown to US$52,3bn in 2014 from $29,9bn in 2010. Total investment grew from 21% of GDP in 2009 to 34% of GDP in 2014, having peaked at 37% in 2012, according to World Bank data.

“Ethiopia has cleverly taken big bets which are set to pay off and make Ethiopia the new manufacturing hot spot,” Satchu says.

Ethiopia received $5bn worth of foreign direct investment in the first phase of the GTP. It hopes to grow this to $8bn in the next five years. Its industrial zones — which cover 3500ha of land — have attracted substantial investment.

The country has six industrial zones, which allow for tax holidays of up to seven years and low tariffs on imported manufactured goods. The early establishment of “Shoe City” by the Chinese Huajian Group — which employs more than 3000 workers — has helped lure 20 more Chinese companies into the industrial zones.

“Ethiopia remains a ‘command’ economy and most closely [resembles] the Chinese structure ahead of its great leapfrog into the 21st century,” Satchu says.

GTP 1’s projects include the Grand Renaissance Dam on the Nile River and Gilgel Gibe III Dam, together boosting the country’s electricity generation to 10000MW upon completion in 2017, from current capacity of just 2 200MW.

This capacity, once the extra is exported, could earn Ethiopia foreign exchange of up to $1bn/year, the World Bank says. A project to build 1000km of distribution infrastructure to Kenya is under way, which will facilitate exports.

Ethiopia already exports power to Kenya, Sudan and Djibouti. It has signed deals to supply Tanzania, Rwanda, South Sudan and Yemen.

Most of the $6,6bn required to finance the Grand Renaissance Dam ($4,8bn) is from government coffers. The rest of the funding comes from Chinese banks. Using its GTPs, Ethiopia plans to produce 15 000MW of power by 2020, some of which will come from renewable energy sources.

But energy hasn’t been the government’s only focus. Ethiopia plans to have 5 000km of new working railway lines across the country by 2020. This includes Addis Ababa Light Rail, the $475m, 32km passenger rail line under construction by a Chinese firm. Also under construction is the 700km Addis-Djibouti railway line, scheduled for completion in 2016, which will mainly serve manufacturing industries. It will cost $4bn.

Ethiopia is also expanding the capital’s airport to triple the number of passengers it handles to 20m/year by 2018.

Education has been recognised as another priority. The country has built 30 new universities — which will jump to 40 by 2017, a massive rise from the two universities in 2000. The quality of the education, however, has been criticised.

Satchu says: “Trickle down is notoriously slow, but increasingly citizens at ground level will feel the economic upswing, particularly by the trend of manufacturing job creation.”

Ethiopia has been able to contain annual consumer price inflation to 7% in 2014, compared with 39% in 2011, with tight monetary policy.

A recent World Bank report suggests a shift from Ethiopia’s traditional approach of financing infrastructure using government money to a more pronounced role for the private sector.

The report adds: “Ethiopia’s growth may decelerate in the coming decade, making it challenging for Ethiopia to attain its middle-income country target by 2025.”

In July, US president Barack Obama will be the first sitting American president to visit Ethiopia for talks on closer economic ties and security.

Source: Financial Mail

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FRAGILE STATES INDEX 2015 http://www.wardheernews.com/fragile-states-index-2015/ http://www.wardheernews.com/fragile-states-index-2015/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 22:46:47 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32134 By FFP The Fragile States Index is an annual ranking of 178 nations based on their levels of stability and the pressures they face. The Index is based on The Fund for Peace’s proprietary Conflict Assessment Software Tool (CAST) analytical … Continued

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By FFP
The Fragile States Index is an annual ranking of 178 nations based on their levels of stability and the pressures they face. The Index is based on The Fund for Peace’s proprietary Conflict Assessment Software Tool (CAST) analytical platform. Based on comprehensive social science methodology, data from three primary sources is triangulated and subjected to critical review to obtain final scores for the Fragile States Index. Millions of documents are analyzed every year, and by applying highly specialized search parameters, scores are apportioned for every country based on twelve key political, social and economic indicators and over 100 sub-indicators that are the result of years of painstaking expert social science research.
Fragile states 2015The 2015 Fragile States Index, the 11th edition of the annual Index, comprises data collected between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014, thus, certain well publicized events that have occurred since January 1, 2015 are not covered by the 2015 Index.
The Fragile States Index scores should be interpreted with the understanding that the lower the score, the better. Therefore, a reduced score indicates an improvement, just as a higher score indicates greater instability. For an explanation of the various indicators and their icons, please refer to page 17. Also, in a departure from previous years, readers will notice a significant de-emphasis on rankings, as it is our firm belief that a country’s score (and indeed, its indicator scores) are a far more important and accurate indicator of a country’s performance, and that as much as countries should be compared against othercountries, it is more useful to compare a country against itself, over time. Hence, our rankings are now printed in reverse order, and our analysis now focuses more on broad categories rather than specific rankings. We have also changed our “Heat Map”, whereby “cooler” colors are now applied to more less at – risk categories. We trust this will provide a less alarming view of the globe.South Sudan has topped the Fragile States Index for the second year in succession, as the country continues to be wracked by internal conflict, fractious politics, and poverty. South Sudan is joined at the most fragile end of the Index by countries that have long struggled, such as Somalia, Central African Republic, Sudan, and D.R. Congo. However, a lack of change at the most fragile end of the Index (not to mention a similar lack of change at the sustainable end of the Index) belies the significant movement of a number of countries over the past year and indeed the past decade

Read the full report: FRAGILE STATES INDEX 2015

Source: FFP

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The Night of Power: Do You Have An Ambitious Plan? http://www.wardheernews.com/the-night-of-power-do-you-have-an-ambitious-plan/ http://www.wardheernews.com/the-night-of-power-do-you-have-an-ambitious-plan/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 20:14:27 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32131 By Deana Nassar A study by WHO has revealed that 71 years was the average life expectancy at birth of the global population in 2014. A quick calculation reveals that converted to months this would be equal to 852 months. … Continued

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By Deana Nassar

-The Night of Power-

Every Ramadan and without fail, I feel saddened that the month speeds by quickly and every year I find myself in the last ten days

A study by WHO has revealed that 71 years was the average life expectancy at birth of the global population in 2014.

A quick calculation reveals that converted to months this would be equal to 852 months.

Given these numbers I was pushed to think of the last ten days of Ramadan which were approaching where, as Muslims, we’re promised that one of these ten nights will be Laylat al-Qadr, The Night of Power, which is described in the Quran as better than a thousand months in the beautiful verses:

{Indeed, we sent the Quran down during the Night of Decree. And what can make you know what the Night of Decree is? The Night of Decree is better than a thousand months.} (97:1-3)

Wow, better than a thousand months; meditate, contemplate and reflect what a blessing.

A night where all our sins will be wiped clean off the slate; a night where we will be forgiven; a night which is equal to 1000 months of good deeds if we benefit from it and worship.

I remember years ago as a child, my father taught us of the beauty of Ramadan explaining that the first ten days of the blessed month are the days of mercy, the second ten days are the days of forgiveness and the last ten days are to seek refuge in God from the hellfire.

Pondering on the inherent logical sequence of the above, we cannot be exempt from fire without first being forgiven and to be forgiven, we must be graced by God’s mercy.

I recall all too clearly how devastated I was when my father told me that Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) was made to forget the exact time the Night of Power after it was revealed to him, when he saw two companions arguing and he intervened to clear their differences.

He informed his followers however that the night would be on the eve of an odd numbered night.

“Did the companions have to argue?” I innocently asked my dad. “Now we will never know”. I was distraught.

There is a reason for everything he said, adding I will understand when I am older.

Every Ramadan and without fail, I feel saddened that the month speeds by quickly and every year I find myself in the last ten days, surprised, anxious and bewildered wondering where the month went. Did I waste the days and nights busy with worldly accomplishments, busy with my children or work or have I pushed myself to the limits?

I for one admit I may have slackened and am saddened with regret promising every year that this is the last year I will fall back on worship. I promise myself I will step up to the plate and raise the bar higher and become a better practicing Muslim as I was nurtured to be.

Born and raised in Australia, my parents worked extra hard instilling in my siblings and I the beauty of worship. They taught us that although we may feel we have sinned too long and too badly or fell short during this month to ever be accepted by God, we should not believe it.

Our sin is never too great, and the hour is never too late. We were taught to make up for whatever shortcomings we had during the month on this special night.

Luckily for us as Muslims, we are blessed with the knowledge that God really is All Forgiving. We know that God loves us no matter what and He loves us no matter what we did or who we are. But this doesn’t mean He wants us to keep on doing the stuff that drags us down from the life that we need to live on in preparation for the life after.

Preparing for these special days, we can ask ourselves what we really want from God. Make a list of each and everything, no matter how small or how big it is, whether it deals with this world or not. God loves to hear from us.

Once this list is ready, we can ask Him to give us those things, we can think about what actions we have taken to acquire those things, and lastly we can develop a work plan to get those things in future; consider it a night of power workshop if you will.

As mentioned earlier, the last 10 days are a chance to reflect and evaluate ourselves. There comes a time when we need to ask ourselves those questions that need to be asked.

Do an evaluation of where we are and where we are going. Let this evaluation lead us to feel happiness for the good we have done and remorse for the bad we have done. This latter feeling should make it easier to seek God’s sincere forgiveness when making the supplications we talked about above.

Aisha, the wife of the Prophet, once asked the Prophet, if I am able to worship God on the night of power what do you recommend I do on that night?

The Prophet advised her with this following supplication:

“O Allah, You are forgiving and You love forgiveness, so forgive me.” (At-Tirmidhi)

We were taught that God looks back and sees how far we have come during the month. He never calculates our progression on our passion. He calculates our progression on the scale of the intention to improve and to change and in the process we ask for forgiveness.

How to Get Prepared

We have acknowledged the significance of the night. Now what?

How can we prepare, after all 1000 months as WHO previously confirmed is longer than the average life span and we wouldn’t want it to go to waste. Imagine one night of worship equal to 1000 months or 83.3 years.

Make a Checklist

The end of year exams finally over, I asked my children to make a ‘to do’ checklist for each night since the Night of Power could be any of the last 10 days of Ramadan. The list I told them should define how we would like our night, the one better than a thousand months, to be used.

The list will help us avoid wasting our time in unproductive chats which are common in the festive atmosphere of the Night of Power especially for my youngest who retrieved his cell phone which I had confiscated in order that he study for his tests.

Jokingly, he said he will use all his might to supplicate to God that the people marking his exams overlook his mistakes and that his scores will be high enough to enter the college he has dreamed about for years. I looked at him and made a private prayer that his prayers are answered so that I can say “see I told you so.”

I used his example of hoping the markers overlook his mistakes outlining that with God we can go one step further and ask forgiveness and have it wiped off the slate of our sins.

The Night of power is truly sacred. I also made a prayer that he and my other children received the Godly rewards in order that they enter Paradise, for me as a mother, this was much more important than his college. But then again priorities change with age.

While worldly wishes are good as well, my ‘to do’ list tried to focus on what was significant for myself and my family and learnt that forgiveness or maghfira is the best blessing to ask for. When we ask for thiswe are asking for God to cover up our sin for us and to protect us from the effect of our sin. We ask Him that even though we committed that sin, that He not punish us for it.

Upgrading our supplication we can ask for afw, which simply means we are asking God to completely erase the sin, such that its traces are also removed. This means that our slate is literally wiped clean and there will be no questioning for those sins on the Day of Judgment.

It is good to know that we are responsible for all our actions. The fact that we may have fallen short does not, as we initially thought, mean we messed up totally; it is an opportunity in these days to get back up onto our feet again, if we accept the forgiveness of God and move on from the past we will continue in good deeds and worshipping long after the month is over.

Remember this is a night of ambition where we don’t simply ask for forgiveness, but for removing even the traces of our sin. It is when we ask for a clean slate. When God tells us about afw in the Quran, it is usually with something major as if to tell us, there is no sin too great. It can all be wiped away.

Strive to awaken the heart of your spirit and in turn awaken meaning to life. When the heart begins to thrive, doing good deeds becomes easy, and desires become unattractive and even disgusting. Do not give up on yourself, because God has not. And know that even in this state, you are beloved to God and He wants you close. A worthy scholar once narrated:

“If you were to open the heart of the disobedient believer, its light would blind the universe. What then of the obedient believer?”

These last ten days I have made a conscientious decision to close the door to the past and stop beating myself up for what I did or did not do then. I won’t make my limitations and weaknesses in Ramadan my memories.

Our past may be our worst, but we can make the present our best. We must stop regretting not doing well enough in terms of worship when we are given the opportunity to be able to keep on moving. Learn from our past, don’t live in it.

Years along and my father long gone, I understand his lesson now when I was teary eyed because we didn’t know the exact day of the Night of power.

He said to me then, when something is hidden, it is a sign of its value and those who truly understand this will work to find the hidden treasure in this night and that is why we are advised to work and prepare for it.

Deana Nassar is a published writer, and has a Bachelor’s Degree in Commerce, but freely left a promising career to be a stay-at-home mom. As a mother of four, in her home she’s the sole expert on all things related to marriage, children’s psychology, motherhood and creative survival.

Source: OnIslam

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New app helps pilgrims count tawaf rounds http://www.wardheernews.com/new-app-helps-pilgrims-count-tawaf-rounds/ http://www.wardheernews.com/new-app-helps-pilgrims-count-tawaf-rounds/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 19:44:21 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32127 JEDDAH: The Grand Mosque is now providing pilgrims with a mobile phone app that can keep track of their rounds during the tawaf or circumambulation of the Kaaba. The app is available through the Google Play Store and can be … Continued

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file-01-1435780901546661900.jpg

JEDDAH: The Grand Mosque is now providing pilgrims with a mobile phone app that can keep track of their rounds during the tawaf or circumambulation of the Kaaba.

The app is available through the Google Play Store and can be downloaded and connected to the mosque’s system. It issues an alert when the pilgrim completes the seventh and last round.

Bandar Al-Khazeem, director of the information technology center of the Grand Mosque, said the app has been developed with Umm Al-Qura University’s technical innovation center, a local publication reported on Wednesday.

“The tawaf application helps you track the number of completed rounds and informs you when your tawaf is complete. The application uses a mix of sensors in your smartphone such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and motion sensors to determine your location within the Haram,” according to information provided on the app store by the developers.

They said that they are using Bluetooth because testing is currently under way on Bluetooth Low Energy technology that is much better than GPS to preserve battery life.

Meanwhile, Al-Khazeem said that the center also provides free Wi-Fi in the courtyards of the Grand Mosque to help connect people and those working on the premises. There are also services for iftar and itikaaf. All the information is available in Arabic, English, French, Turkish, Urdu and Farsi.

According to Maj. Gen. Khaled Qarar Al-Harbi, head of the special emergency forces, the number of pilgrims is expected to rise by 80 percent during the second quarter of the month, and more in the final 10 days. Plans are in place to deal with this increase, he said.

Source: ArabNews

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Sewing Trust at Home http://www.wardheernews.com/sewing-trust-at-home/ http://www.wardheernews.com/sewing-trust-at-home/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:10:26 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32125 By Teresa Welsh MINNEAPOLIS – Just last week, a North Carolina man was arrested for allegedly providing material support to the Islamic State group and planning violent attacks in the United States. Two other men were arrested in New York … Continued

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By Teresa Welsh

MINNEAPOLIS – Just last week, a North Carolina man was arrested for allegedly providing material support to the Islamic State group and planning violent attacks in the United States. Two other men were arrested in New York and New Jersey recently, charged with the same crimes, including attempts to detonate an explosive in the New York metro area. At least one of them hoped to travel abroad to join the terrorist organization, according to the charges. These sorts of arrests are a new reality in the United States, with more than 180 Americans attempting to or successfully traveling to Syria.

minneapolis1Authorities are struggling to understand what appeal the Islamic State group holds for youth, who have proven to be the most susceptible to recruiting efforts, outside the Middle East and what would draw them to travel abroad or carry out homegrown attacks in the U.S. The government faces a massive challenge in countering the appeal of the group that has successfully recruited foreign fighters from around the globe to help it wage its war of terror in Iraq and Syria.

As part of its response, the federal government launched a pilot program in three cities that aims to better understand why youth in Boston, Los Angeles and Minneapolis may be incentivized to leave the U.S. to travel to such a dangerous region. The efforts on countering violent extremism – known as CVE – seek to address root causes of extremism through community engagement and undermine attraction to terrorist activity. It is a preventive counterterrorism program that seeks to build awareness in communities and intervene when young people are believed to be falling under the influence of extremist groups and building awareness in their communities. The U.S. is also partnering with foreign governments to address the issue, particularly terrorist groups’ use of social media to attract recruits.

“[W]e have to recognize that our best partners in all these efforts, the best people to help protect individuals from falling victim to extremist ideologies are their own communities, their own family members. We have to be honest with ourselves. Terrorist groups like al-Qaida and [the Islamic State group] deliberately target their propaganda in the hopes of reaching and brainwashing young Muslims, especially those who may be disillusioned or wrestling with their identity,” President Barack Obama said at a White House Summit in February that brought together law enforcement and community leaders to discuss CVE implementation.

The Twin Cities are home to the largest Somali population in the U.S., an estimated 100,000 people. Refugees began settling in Minnesota after the government of Somalia collapsed in 1991. This isn’t the first time the community has struggled to counter the appeal of violent extremism to the state’s Somalis, but is much more puzzling. Somalis have no national or ethnic ties to Syria and Iraq, a link that helped explain why some went to fight with al-Shabab when Ethiopia invaded Somalia in 2006. Young men joining that terrorist group felt a nationalistic call to defend their nation against rival state Ethiopia, but many of those drawn to the Islamic State were born in the U.S. and have never been to Somalia, let alone Syria. Still in April, six Twin Cities youth were arrested for attempting to join the Islamic State group. At least one of the men has conspired to travel to Syria since 2014, according to prosecutors.

“As far as we know there is no one profile that brings [together] all these people who are leaving,” says Abdisalam Adam, an imam at Dar Al-Hijrah Mosque in Minneapolis. “Some people say, ‘Oh they are the ones who are not doing well,’ or whatever. That’s not true. There are some of them who have the opportunity of working, some are in school.”

The Somali community is united on two matters: the issue must be addressed, and the community needs increased access to resources to ensure youth have ample educational and economic opportunities to deter the appeal of extremist activity. But how to go about doing that presents a large challenge to a hard-working Somali community that wants to keep its young men safe but avoid government surveillance and counter negative narratives in the media. Some argue that the community should do it without government involvement, while others see genuine value in partnering with law enforcement to maximize resources. Both the district attorney’s office and the community agree that the approach must be community-based but some are still skeptical of government involvement. And even the name of the program has prompted criticism.

Read more: Sewing Trust at Home

Source: USA Today

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Somalia reached ‘tipping point,’ can secure peace, U.N. official says http://www.wardheernews.com/somalia-reached-tipping-point-can-secure-peace-u-n-official-says/ http://www.wardheernews.com/somalia-reached-tipping-point-can-secure-peace-u-n-official-says/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 15:48:59 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32117 NAIROBI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Somalia has made “remarkable” progress in the last two years and has reached a “tipping point” where it can secure peace, the chief United Nations official in Somalia said on Thursday. Philippe Lazzarini spoke to … Continued

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NAIROBI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Somalia has made “remarkable” progress in the last two years and has reached a “tipping point” where it can secure peace, the chief United Nations official in Somalia said on Thursday.

Philippe_Lazzarini

Philippe Lazzarini

Philippe Lazzarini spoke to reporters in Nairobi as he stepped down after 2-1/2 years as U.N. Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia, which has been mired in conflict since 1991.

“For the first time, a real peace and state-building agenda is on the table and the Somalis are committed, behind it,” he said. “I think a tipping point has been reached to make it happen.”

Diplomats and experts note steady, if often slow, gains in rebuilding the state, but say the government still needs to tackle corruption and threats from an Islamist insurgency.

Western governments have stepped up support for Somalia since its first elected president in 45 years took office in 2012.

Only parliamentarians were eligible to vote then, and were chosen by community elders. But there are plans to broaden the franchise in nationwide elections in 2016.

The initial goal of a popular vote is unlikely to be achieved, but the government is committed to a more inclusive way of picking members of parliament, diplomats say.

“Somalia is a positive narrative in the making,” said Lazzarini. “It is one of the optimistic stories in a world falling apart with crisis and conflict.”

Mogadishu has changed dramatically in the last few years, partly as a result of investment by Somalis who have returned home from abroad.

“The progress is quite remarkable,” Lazzarini said, pointing to its new airport and hospital.

The Somali army and African Union peacekeepers have driven the al Qaeda-linked militant group al Shabaab, which once ruled much of Somalia, out of major strongholds over the last year.

But the group still threatens regional stability and has launched a series of attacks during the current Muslim fasting month of Ramadan.

Lazzarini said that more must be done to improve security, which would enable the United Nations to scale up its assistance. Some 700,000 Somalis need humanitarian aid, the majority of them internally displaced in cities, he said.

“We are operating in an extraordinarily volatile and dangerous environment,” he said. “We operate with armored vehicles and armed escorts and, daily, we have security threats.”

The United Nations has been attacked six times during Lazzarini’s tenure, resulting in the deaths of seven U.N. staff and dozens of bystanders.

“It is a bumpy road but the trajectory is certainly in the right direction,” he said.

(Reporting by Katy Migiro, editing by Tim Pearce.

Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation,

———–

Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women’s rights, corruption and climate change.

 

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Jobless youth in Northern Kenya a ‘time bomb’ http://www.wardheernews.com/jobless-youth-in-northern-kenya-a-time-bomb/ http://www.wardheernews.com/jobless-youth-in-northern-kenya-a-time-bomb/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:58:57 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32114 BY STEPHEN ASTARIKO RISING unemployment among youths in Northern Kenya makes them a soft target for recruitment by gangs and terrorists, population experts have said. “If the challenges facing the youth are not addressed at an early stage, we could … Continued

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BY STEPHEN ASTARIKO

RISING unemployment among youths in Northern Kenya makes them a soft target for recruitment by gangs and terrorists, population experts have said.

“If the challenges facing the youth are not addressed at an early stage, we could be staring at a time bomb,” area population coordinator Ken Luaki said on Monday.

Madogo Northern Kenya

Angry youths from Madogo protesting at the Garissa-Nairobi road where they paralyzed transport for the second day runningthe bone fires that were lit by the angry youths at the Garissa-Nairobi road. Photo/File

He was addressing Muslim clerics and members of the civil society at a Garissa hotel.

The workshop was funded by the National Council for Population and Development.

Luaki said population challenges facing the predominantly Muslim region are unique and need a different approach.

“We want you to own the process from the word go so that it becomes easier for us to implement going forward,” he said.

The coordinator said family planning and condom use are sensitive issues in the area and must be approached “in a manner that will not offend our Muslim brothers and sisters”.

Luaki said an action plan will be implemented in phases.

He said the plan will be made to suit the region and be respectful to the Islamic faith.

Source: The Star

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Warka Raadiyo Wardheer http://www.wardheernews.com/warka-raadiyo-wardheer-583/ http://www.wardheernews.com/warka-raadiyo-wardheer-583/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:50:39 +0000 http://www.wardheernews.com/?p=32119 Warka Raadiyo Wardheer ee aan idiin heyno waxaa ka mid ah:Ahlusuna oo sheegtay in aysan ka war qabin doorasha ka dhacday Dhuusa Mareeb, Markabkii Nawaan 3 oo maanka ku wajahan Boosaaso iyo warar kalle. Halkan fadlan ka dhegeyso warka oo … Continued

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Warka Raadiyo Wardheer ee aan idiin heyno waxaa ka mid ah:Ahlusuna oo sheegtay in aysan ka war qabin doorasha ka dhacday Dhuusa Mareeb, Markabkii Nawaan 3 oo maanka ku wajahan Boosaaso iyo warar kalle.

Halkan fadlan ka dhegeyso warka oo dhan:

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